U.S. Supreme Court strikes down California’s restriction on violent video games

Today the United States Supreme Court struck down California’s ban on selling violent video games to children.  From the majority opinion written by Justice Scalia:

California’s legislation straddles the fence between (1) addressing a serious social problem and (2) helping concerned parents control their children. Both ends are legitimate, but when they affect First Amendment rights they must be pursued by means that are neither seriously underinclusive nor seriously overinclusive. See Church of Lukumi Babalu Aye, Inc. v. Hialeah, 508 U. S. 520, 546 (1993). As a means of protecting children from portrayals of violence, the legislation is seriously underinclusive, not only because it excludes portrayals other than video games, but also because it permits a parental or avuncular veto. And as a means of assisting concerned parents it is seriously overinclusive because it abridges the First Amendment rights of young people whose parents (and aunts and uncles) think violent video games are a harm-less pastime. And the overbreadth in achieving one goal is not cured by the underbreadth in achieving the other.Legislation such as this, which is neither fish nor fowl, cannot survive strict scrutiny.

You can read the entire decision in Brown v. Entertainment Merchants Association here.

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